Category Archives: Wuhan Virus

Bookworm Beat 6/19/20 — the corporate pandering, Aunt Jemima edition

Can we still laugh at the leftist war on every American institution and value, including Aunt Jemima pancake mix? Read these memes and then you tell me.
























































Watcher of Weasels 2020-05-31 01:23:21

In the old days, when even a cold could be deadly, it was only polite to stay home. In a Wuhan virus time, we’re going to see a return to those manners.

When I was little, my mother often kept me home from school. Over the years, I’ve assumed this was because I was adept at manipulating her into thinking I was too sick to go to school, and she certainly did like having me home. In retrospect, though, I realize there was an additional factor involved.

My mother was older than my peers’ mothers, for she was almost 40 when I was born. She had grown up in a pre-antibiotic era, as well as surviving a concentration camp in the tropics. She’d had Diptheria as a child and tuberculosis in camp. She also got cave fever (whatever the heck that is) in Israel after the war and almost died.

The same was true for my dad, who was over 40 when I was born. He’d been born into the hell of post-WWI Berlin and, to make that more extreme, he’d spent his first five years in a slum before being placed in an orphanage. He’d had scarlet fever when he was little although thankfully it didn’t affect his heart. During the Israeli War of Independence, he almost died from some disease that no one at the time was able to identify. He died almost fifty years later without ever knowing what almost killed him.

For the first half of my parents’ lives before I was born, there was no such thing as a “little” illness. Every cold could become pneumonia. Every small cut was a pathway to sepsis.

When my friends’ American-born parents were sending them to school saying, “It’s just a little cold; you’ll be fine,” my mother was tucking me up in bed to recover safely. Moreover, she found it indescribably rude when other parents sent their sick children to school, which created the risk that I’d bring their germs home. All illness was dangerous.

Once I left home, I finally accepted the mores of my American culture. As a young lawyer, I worked a 60-80 week no matter what. Once I had children, the rule in our household, for adults as well as children, was that, if you didn’t have a high fever and weren’t losing fluids in unpleasant ways, you were well enough to go to school or go to work. For large chunks of the year, someone in our house was always sick, and the same was true for every house in the neighborhood. We were proud of our stoicism.

We had an advantage, though, when it came to being stoic, for we knew that these sicknesses weren’t going to kill us. Even when my son’s cold turned into pneumonia, a short stay in the hospital with an antibiotic IV cured him. (And yes, I did find it upsetting and worrying but he was bright as a penny again within one day of leaving the hospital.) For almost forty years, the rule in my life has been that illness is unpleasant, not fatal, so if you’re sick, out you go.

The Wuhan virus has changed my mind, and I suspect I’m not the only one. When I went running errands, I realized that thanks to the virus, the modern American mindset that has governed me for so long is over. We’re back to my parents’ world view.

I did not wear a mask to Lowe’s today because there are no active cases in my community. Only about 20% of the customers people in the store were masked.  and, while the employees all had masks on, most had them slung under their noses. I got the feeling that their mindset was “I’ve got to breathe but, if I sneeze, I won’t spray my germs.”

However, if an unmasked customer in a Lowe’s aisle had coughed in my direction, I would have skittered out of that aisle. While I’m willing to be out and about and proceed mostly in a normal fashion, I suddenly have developed my parents’ mindset: If you’re sick, stay home and don’t make other people sick. Even a little cough can be deadly.

I suspect I won’t be alone. Indeed, thanks to telecommuting, even those businesses that still maintain some office will encourage their employees to work from home if they’re the slightest bit symptomatic. Schools will probably be the same.

What happened yesterday at my hairstylist, though, was completely over the top. Thanks to state regulations and insurance requirements, I felt as if I was going into the cleanroom at some hi-tech manufacturer. I’ve already blogged about the hoops I had to jump through just to get there so I won’t repeat it here. Let me just say that, if you’re wearing a mask when you get your haircut, you end up with your mask filled with hair. It’s ugly.

Still, there is good news, which is that I may have just gotten the best haircut ever. This is a new stylist because my first attempt at getting a haircut here in South Carolina was not pretty. This new gal is a genius and I am ridiculously happy. The laughable hoops and the hair-filled mask were worth it. Even better, the cut cost 65% less than I would have paid in California. Can’t beat that!

Image: Photo by Andrea Piacquadio from Pexels (cropped).

This so-called ‘new normal’ had better not be the permanent ‘normal’

In 1920, Warren G. Harding’s campaign slogan was “a return to normalcy.” He won. Perhaps that ought to be Trump’s new slogan: “Make America Normal Again.”

One of the ickiest phrases around lately is the “new normal.” We’re told by leftist politicos and a thousand commercials that we’re in the “new normal.” This “normal,” we’re told, will last until there is a vaccine for the Wuhan China Virus. Achieving a vaccination currently has the 12th of Never as its deadline for completion.

The new normal is that I stand outside of Walmart and Trader Joe’s, in 90-degree weather with 90 percent humidity, waiting for permission to enter.

The new normal is that, when I go to the dentist, the waiting room is off-limits. Instead, I stand in the doorway while the masked receptionist quizzes me about my health history, makes sure I have a mask, waves a wand at me to take my temperature, and then tells me to wait outside in my car (with the engine running, spewing pollutants, so I can have life-giving air-conditioning) until I’m called in. When my appointment is over and I sign the various forms, the same masked receptionist blithely hands me her tablet and pen, neither disinfected, so that I can sign.

The worst thing, though, is how this “new normal” affects my hair cut. I currently look like Albert Einstein’s lost love child. It’s not pretty.

Even though (thankfully) South Carolina is not a “stay-at-home” lockdown state, the state, while leaving big box stores open, closed all hairstyling establishments. On the day they opened, I called my stylist and was able to get an appointment two weeks out.

During the appointment phone call, the receptionist told me that the stylist would be masked and gloved, that I must be masked, that I must check in from the parking lot via telephone, and that the receptionist will call me when I can enter, at which point she’ll wave an app at my to take my temperature. If I have one of my hot flashes, my temperature will be about 104 degrees. So much for the cheerful camaraderie of a hair salon.

That was bad enough. It got worse. With my appointment around the corner, I got an email with a form I have to complete to get my hair cut:

I don’t blame the hairstylist for this risible form. I know that it’s because she has to comply with the form, just as she has the new check-in rituals and mask and glove requirement, so that she can keep her insurance. However, I don’t want this to be the “new normal.”

The reality is that my county has had only 142 reported Wuhan China virus cases. The state of South Carolina estimates another 872 cases based upon an algorithm that says that, for every reported case, there might be another 6-8 cases that are so de minimus that they don’t merit a doctor’s visit.

Just to put that in perspective, my county has about 150,000 or more people. That means 0.09% of people in my county were diagnosed with the Wuhan China virus. I think 17 might have died, but I’m not sure. If that’s the case, then 0.01% of my county’s population will have succumbed to the virus. My county, incidentally, is over 25% black, which I note only because blacks have been more vulnerable to the virus.

The new normal is unacceptable. Where I live, 99.99% of all people are seemingly healthy. Why are we being treated as if this is the new bubonic plague? My objection to this “new normal” isn’t just me whining about the economic effects on a hairdressing establishment that can no longer have multiple customers or a restaurant that can only fill half its tables. This is also about the psychology of living as if we’re all dying.

If it weren’t for the insurance companies and the government, I think most people would snap back. While my Bay Area friends are busy virtue signaling like crazy about wearing masks, here in my little corner of South Carolina, masks are vanishing.

A month ago at the local Walmart, about 50% of the customers were wearing masks, especially black customers. A week ago at the local Walmart, maybe 10% of the customers were wearing masks. Staff members had masks, but many had just pulled them down to hang around their necks.

If my Bay Area friends were to see this, they’d start frothing about suicidal instincts and Trump poisoning people’s minds so that they clearly want to die. Frankly, I don’t think people here have a death wish; they have a normal wish.

I honestly believe that Trump would do well with a Make America Normal Again campaign. Combine that with what an Obama economist believes will be the biggest economic boom in American history, and you’ve got a winning combination.

Oh, did I not mention that economic boom? Here’s what Politico has to say:

In early April, Jason Furman, a top economist in the Obama administration and now a professor at Harvard, was speaking via Zoom to a large bipartisan group of top officials from both parties. The economy had just been shut down, unemployment was spiking and some policymakers were predicting an era worse than the Great Depression. The economic carnage seemed likely to doom President Donald Trump’s chances at reelection.

Furman, tapped to give the opening presentation, looked into his screen of poorly lit boxes of frightened wonks and made a startling claim.

“We are about to see the best economic data we’ve seen in the history of this country,” he said.

I believe that too. If we’re just allowed to be normal, we’ll explode into prosperity, especially because Trump is loosening job-killing regulations.

You know what else Politico has to say?

Furman’s counterintuitive pitch has caused some Democrats, especially Obama alumni, around Washington to panic. “This is my big worry,” said a former Obama White House official who is still close to the former president. Asked about the level of concern among top party officials, he said, “It’s high — high, high, high, high.”

And top policy officials on the Biden campaign are preparing for a fall economic debate that might look very different than the one predicted at the start of the pandemic in March. “They are very much aware of this,” said an informal adviser.

You read that right. Democrats desperately want a failing economy because they think that’s the only way they can knock Trump out of the White House. That’s why the pressure for the New Normal. If we restore the old normal and get back to the business of America, Democrats are done for, they’re cooked, and they can’t even justify the fraud of mail-in ballots. And that’s why they keep the panic going, so I have to fill out a 14 question form to get my hair cut.

Bookworm Beat 5/25/20 — Memorial Day illustrated edition

This mammoth illustrated edition honors Memorial Day, then tackles the Wuhan Virus, Biden, Democrats, government, and finally ends with a few good laughs.





















































Biden can no longer speak coherently:


















This is your cat on drugs….

 

A note on the featured image: “Air Force Master Sgt. Robert Lilly pays his respects to a fallen veteran May 28, 2013, at the Southern Nevada Veterans Memorial Cemetery, Boulder City, Nevada. Lilly and other Airmen from Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., volunteered their time to place flags over veterans’ cemetery plots for Memorial Day weekend. Lilly is a 57th Operations Group joint terminal air controller. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Daniel Hughes)”

America is killing itself with a political and cultural cytokine storm

An immune system overreaction (a cytokine storm) can be more deadly than the disease. America’s political immune system is overreacting, and it’s killing us.

An older friend of mine lives in Oregon, which has had 137 deaths from the Wuhan virus. In a population of 4,217,737, that means that 0.0032% of the Oregon population has been felled by the virus. Forty percent of the deaths have been in Multnomah County, which is home to Portland, Oregon’s largest city.

That 40% figure is misleading, though. Another county, Washington, has had 11% of the deaths – but Washington is part of the greater Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro Oregon and Washington Area. That means that greater Portland accounts for 51% of Oregon’s 137 deaths. The next most affected area is Marion county, home to Salem, the state capital, which has had 17% of the deaths.

My friend lives in Deschutes County, which has had a total of zero deaths. It’s also had 94 cases. With a population of 186,807, that means that only 0.05% of the county caught the virus – and, again, no one has died.

Despite these staggeringly low statistics, Oregon’s governor, Kate Brown, a Democrat, has announced that the entire state of Oregon will continue to be locked down until July 6. This is insane, whether we’re looking at insane paranoia or an insane lust for control.

Despite the lockdown, the governor has not made masks mandatory. Unfortunately for my older friend, the Costco in Bend, Oregon, is making everyone wear a mask. Again, keep in mind that all of Deschutes County has had zero deaths.

So my older friend dutifully dons her mask, goes to the Costco – and a short time later collapses from hypoxia (i.e., oxygen deprivation). Fortunately, since she has ongoing balance issues, she wears a helmet. Had she not worn a helmet, she could easily have struck her head, gotten a brain bleed, and died.

Did I mention that there have been zero deaths in Deschutes County?

Nor is my friend anomalous. Just after I got off the phone following her tear-filled call, I coincidentally read that a man who Wuhan who tried running while wearing a mask suffered a collapsed lung:

A man in China burst a lung after running for more than two miles in the coronavirus epicenter city of Wuhan while wearing a face mask, according to a report.

The 26-year-old jogger was rushed to Wuhan Central Hospital, where he underwent major surgery for the collapsed lung after he began having difficulty breathing, the UK’s Sun reported.

[snip]

Health officials believe the man’s lung burst because he was wearing a mask while running.

Chen Baojun, head of thoracic surgery at the hospital, said the man was already susceptible to a spontaneous pneumothorax because of his tall and lanky frame.

In two other incidents involving physical activity, two Chinese boys dropped dead within a week of one another recently while wearing masks during gym class.

The above is not just the craziness of China’s socialized medicine system. While masks are as yet unproven when it comes to protecting against the Wuhan virus, a retired neurosurgeon warns that they can cause real health problems. In ordinary cases, the more stringently a mask protects against particulate matter, such as an N95 mask, which my friend was wearing, the more likely the mask is to cause headaches.

The reason for the headaches is hypoxia:

As to the cause of the headaches, while straps and pressure from the mask could be causative, the bulk of the evidence points toward hypoxia and/or hypercapnia as the cause. That is, a reduction in blood oxygenation (hypoxia) or an elevation in blood C02 (hypercapnia). It is known that the N95 mask, if worn for hours, can reduce blood oxygenation as much as 20%, which can lead to a loss of consciousness, as happened to the hapless fellow driving around alone in his car wearing an N95 mask, causing him to pass out, and to crash his car and sustain injuries. I am sure that we have several cases of elderly individuals or any person with poor lung function passing out, hitting their head. This, of course, can lead to death. (Emphasis mine.)

And there you have my friend, saved only by the fact that she wears that helmet whenever she’s out of the house.

It gets worse. Cutting through the medical language, Dr. Blaylock explains that hypoxia can affect the blood oxygen level. You’re not just breathless; you’re fundamentally de-oxygenated. A significant drop in blood oxygen impairs immunity, meaning that people are more, not less, likely to get the Wuhan virus.

Low blood oxygen can also stop the body’s ability to fight cancer. So people in lockdown areas who are forced to wear masks are less likely to get their cancer diagnosed or treated and also less likely to have a robust immune system to fight it.

Oh, and one more thing, according to Dr. Blaylock: The most significant factor in the severity of a Wuhan virus infection appears to be viral load. If you catch a few free-floating virus particles while in a parking lot, you’ll probably have a mild case, But if you get a whomping big load on the subway or in a hospital setting, you’ll have a bad case.

People who have a mild or asymptomatic case, because of a low viral load can unwittingly increase their viral load by exhaling the virus into the mask and then inhaling it again. How’s that for an ironic kick in the pants?

The Western world is going to go down in history (assuming there’s anyone left to write a history), as the only civilization that died, not from the plague, but from its insane overresponse to the plague. We are engaged in the civilizational equivalent of a cytokine storm.

Here’s what I mean: The human body’s immune system can overreact, killing someone affected with a contagious illness that is not necessarily fatal. Cytokine storms were the reason that so many healthy young people died from the Spanish influence – it triggered a massive overreaction of their immune system. The Wuhan virus seems to do the same.

In America and other Western countries, our governments and media have responded to the virus with a massive overresponse of preventive measures. Whether it’s total lockdowns that kill the economy or masks that cause oxygen deprivation deaths, it’s not the Wuhan virus that’s destroying us. It’s our overwrought response to the virus.

If America is to survive the Wuhan virus, it needs to ratchet back on its political and culture cytokine storm. Otherwise, we will destroy ourselves before the Wuhan virus even gets its chance to try.

Bookworm Beat 5/14/20: Pent up posting about the current scene

I am exploding with pent-up posts going back two weeks, so I thought a Bookworm Beat might be the best way to do a mental download onto the blog.

A good Obamagate overview. During their Russagate heyday, the leftist media had it easy because they could roll with a single message: “Russia! Russia! Russia!” And failing that, “Climate! Climate! Climate!”

Obamagate is harder because it is, in fact, an actual conspiracy. The nature of conspiracies is that they hide away in the dark, and involve serpentine steps to achieve nefarious goals. When brought to light, the malfeasors scurry away like cockroaches surprised by light. Then, investigators laboriously gather up the Raid and your roach motels to unravel the conspiracy and bring the conspirators before the law.

What I just wrote is a helpful analogy, but the actual facts of Obamagate are a bit harder to explain. That’s why I appreciated John Daniel Davidson’s masterful overview of Obamagate. He carefully avoids getting caught in the weeds of endless dates, actors, and lies, and focuses instead on the broad-brush outlines to reveal “the biggest political scandal of our time.” I actually disagree with that statement. I think that, as far as American politics go, it’s the biggest political scandal ever.

Anyway, if you’re struggling to get a handle on the two different narratives (FISA and Flynn) and the way they dovetail into a single concerted attack on the Trump campaign and then the Trump presidency, Davidson’s article is an excellent way to start.

Matt Taibbi continues his lonely journey as an honest progressive journalist. One of the things I didn’t get to blog about while my site was down was an article two law professors – one from Harvard and one from the University Arizona — wrote for The Atlantic about censorship. If you’re expecting to hear that they wrote a rousing defense of free speech, you’d be wrong. Instead, the professors advocated for abandoning constitutional free speech in favor of Chinese-style censorship, complete with tech giants giving the government the help it needs.

Taibbi does not agree, either with the professors or with other so-called “liberals” advocating for wiping out both the First and Fourth Amendments. While Taibbi doesn’t go back as far as Tom Friedman and his love affair with Chinese-style control, he does round up a few recent examples of how the Wuhan virus has been an opening for “liberals” to let out their inner fascist.

(By the way, I never use the word “liberal” to describe Democrats, progressives, or leftists. It is an obscene misnomer, and I won’t countenance it.)

Taibbi using that leftist drive for censorship as an opening to discuss covers the leftist love for “expertise,” its relentlessly scolding tone (think: Karen), and the severe limitations that hamper even good journalists. It’s a tour de force and deserves a read. Indeed, anyone, especially a progressive, who writes this deserves to be acknowledged, and that’s true even if Taibbi’s leftism still blinds him so that he meekly accepts as accurate the canard that Trump told people to inject over-the-counter disinfectants:

We have a lot of dumb people in this country. But the difference between the stupidities cherished by the Idiocracy set ingesting fish cleaner, and the ones pushed in places like the Atlantic, is that the jackasses among the “expert” class compound their wrongness by being so sure of themselves that they force others to go along. In other words, to combat “ignorance,” the scolders create a new and more virulent species of it: exclusive ignorance, forced ignorance, ignorance with staying power.

The people who want to add a censorship regime to a health crisis are more dangerous and more stupid by leaps and bounds than a president who tells people to inject disinfectant. It’s astonishing that they don’t see this.

Bastiat and the problem with the leftists’ apocalyptic world view. Years ago, I read, and fell in love with, Frédéric Bastiat’s famous economic essay, “What is seen and what is unseen.” In it, he examines the fallacy of those who say that even a broken window is a good thing, for it brings work to the glazier. Bastiat, however, points out that fixing something broken is a dead end. The window’s owner might have spent the same money on something more useful and necessary for him. This lost buying power is the “unseen” part for those who can see only a broken window and a glazier. Or, as Bastiat wrote, “Stop there! Your theory is confined to that which is seen; it takes no account of that which is not seen.”

Leftists have this limited “unseen” thinking about gun violence (they see only those 30,000 who die, not the hundreds of thousands or even millions whose lives guns save). They also have it with abortion, where the focus is on women (who can be seen), rather than on the millions of babies who never got the chance to grow up to be women (or men).

For an example of a “seen” woman’s suffering, think of Michelle Obama, who was very explicit about what a terrible choice it was for her to have children:

“My relationship with Barack was all about our equal partnership,” Obama recalled. “If I was going to have a unique voice with this very opinionated man, I had to get myself up and set myself off to a place where I was going to be his equal.”

[snip]

“The thing that really changed it was the birth of our children. I wasn’t really ready for that. That really made it harder,” the first lady explained. “Something had to give and it was my aspirations and dreams.”

“I made that concession not because he said ‘you have to quit your job,’ but it felt like ‘I can’t do all of this so I have to tone down my aspirations, I have to dial it back,’” she added.

I didn’t particularly want children, but I knew it was a necessary thing to do to further my development as a mature human being. I realized that I’d miss the selfish life (and I did miss it), but that life also frightened me because I saw that it was preventing me from fully growing up. Now that my children are themselves grown, the pay-off for having had them is huge because they are delights to have around. For me, despite the lost sleep, boredom, and frustration, it was a win-win.

But back to Bastiat, progressives, and the Wuhan virus. Actually, I won’t spell out the argument in this post because you can read it here.

San Franciscans are paying the price for subsidizing vice. For a very long time, San Francisco has been subsidizing vice. First, it decriminalized crime. Drug taking, public drunkenness, public excretory functions, stealing (as long as the thief took goods worth less than $950) . . . they’re all allowed in San Francisco. For people who like engaging in those crimes, especially stealing, San Francisco is the place to be.

San Francisco has also been subsidizing substance abuse for quite a long time. Under the banner of decency, it’s made clean needles available to IV drug users and provided them with food, shelter, and other benefits. San Francisco’s progressives say that this is right and proper because drug users are victims too.

It’s true that many homeless people are mentally ill. Of course, it’s a chicken and egg question whether they had pre-existing issues and self-medicated, making themselves worse, or whether the substance abuse itself created the mental health issues. It’s also true that tossing junkies and mentally ill people in jail is not a solution.

These are real problems and require thoughtful approaches. However, you’d also think that someone in San Francisco might have realized that it’s a bad idea to create what is effectively a Utopian environment for disruptive, dangerous, dirty, disease-ridden druggies and other people with anti-social behavior.

Tax-paying, working San Francisco residents have been complaining about the homeless problem for a while now. Still, it’s hard to take their complaints seriously when they elect Chesa Boudin as the town’s DA, the man who promised to decriminalize everything. They also elected London Breed, another hard leftist, to be their mayor.

This is what happens when genuine lifestyle issues (such as being able to walk the streets safely or run a business) crash into virtue signaling. Virtue signaling always wins.

Anyway, the Wuhan virus (or, if you like, the New York virus) has put the whole San Francisco problem on steroids. Daniel Greenfield has a hard-hitting look at what’s happening on the streets of San Francisco:

“People are coming from all over the place, Sacramento, Lake County, Bakersfield,” Jeanine Nicholson, the first lesbian head of the San Francisco Fire Department, grumbled. “People are getting released from jail in other counties and being told to go to San Francisco, where you will get a tent and then you will get housing.”

The people coming to the City by the Bay weren’t wearing flowers in their hair, they were homeless junkies who had heard that they were going to get free hotel rooms, along with pot and booze.

And it was all true. Every word of it.

San Francisco was spending $200 a night to house the homeless, or as the current politically correct euphemism insisted that they be called, the ‘unhoused’, in hotel rooms at a cost of over $100 million.

You have to read his article to believe it and, even after reading it, you might not believe it.

San Francisco always had a wacky edge, but it was an aesthetically beautiful and still functional city. Those days are over. Large parts of San Francisco are sewers with homeless people camped on the streets and affluent citizens hiding in their homes. My old neighborhood, once a working- and middle-class bastion, is the brothel center of San Francisco. The City that Herb Caen always boasted “knew how” is dying.

Go to college; get therapy. Three years ago, I wrote a post about Macalester College, a small and expensive liberal arts college in St. Paul, Minnesota, and its proud boast about having multiple therapy dogs. I was revolted.

If you look at the photo for that post, which is simply the cover of Macalester’s magazine for parents, you’ll see that it shows girls crowding around the therapy dog. That was a familiar sight for me. When I was on a small liberal arts college campus several years ago, one that had a therapy dog, I noticed incoming freshman crowding around the dog, not in a “What a cute dog” way, but in an “I desperately need help way.” I also noticed how highly feminized the boys were, whether they were gay or straight.

Heather MacDonald, who’s a smarter, more knowledgeable, and a better writer than I am, has just written a lengthy article about the therapeutic culture at Yale and other American colleges, something that fuses feminism with mental illness. She describes how students are never told to buck up and embrace their experience. Instead, they are encouraged to revert to toddler-esque panic and equally immature means of relieving that panic. This instruction in helplessness is paired with the bizarre feminization of the therapeutic college culture:

For the last 40 years, men have been an underrepresented minority in higher education, reports American Enterprise Institute scholar Mark Perry. Since 1982, females earned nearly 14 million more college degrees than men. Colleges began a “desperate” search for women faculty in the 1970s that eroded the “intellectual rigor of elite higher education in the U.S.,” says Camille Paglia, the feminist professor and author. “Due to that sudden influx, academe’s entire internal culture changed,” she says. As the female presence has grown, so have claims of a crisis of collegiate mental health.

Nationally, about two-thirds of the students who sought treatment for mental-health disorders in the 2018–19 academic year were female, according to the Center for Collegiate Mental Health. At Yale, therapy use is heavily female and LGBTQ, according to students. “There are few straight men using therapy,” one self-identified “queer” girl in the GLC said. “It’s stigmatized for straight CIS men. Almost all my friends who go to therapy identify as gay or trans.”

I sent my college-attending children links to MacDonald’s article. I think they’ll recognize their classmates, especially their unstable, highly neurotic, angry, and dangerous female classmates, in the article.

You have to read this. Dov Fischer, a lawyer and rabbi, has written an extraordinary article entitled A Time to Hate. He explains how he, like other conservatives during the Obama years, hated Obama’s policies and corruption, while still accepting that Obama was the duly elected president. That is, conservatives understood that Republicans ran lousy candidates and paid the price. It was up to conservatives to step up their game at election time if they wanted something different than the Obama presidency.

Now, however, after three years of unmitigated hysteria, corruption, lies, coups, and other attacks on the core of the Trump presidency (that is, three years of attacks on our constitutional notion of the executive office) Fischer has changed his mind. He has learned to hate.

As I said, the article is extraordinary, and I highly encourage your looking it over.

That’s enough for one day. By the way, as you can see, I’ve changed my “woman writing” picture for a new one that better suits my blog’s format. When you see that image at the head of a post, you’ll know that the post is one that jumbles together a whole lot of things that interest me.