Category Archives: race and culture

THE NEW FRONTIER

Vassar Bushmills

The album was entitled #16, (1963) and inspired by none other than John F Kennedy, a Democrat.

Go Figure

It was the last album of theirs I ever bought.

I wonder if the words will work today?

 

 

ICYMI from Vassar Bushmills.com

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FIRST PRINCIPLES ABOUT AMERICA; FIRST QUESTIONS

Vassar Bushmills

Is America an accident? A freak of Nature?  Or, is America the product of Intelligent Design?

I don’t intend to try to answer the second half of that question here as that requires an inquiry into philosophy and theology. But by the longest list of scientific and common sense proofs, I think I can say without equivocation that America is no accident. We cannot be a freak of Nature. So you can sort of figure out the rest yourself.

This is something we no longer teach our children, but we are unique.

Now, scholars (intellectuals) for the past 200 years have had no problem ignoring this question, for they think it’s a trick question, which does not really require an answer. If they reply that Yes, America is a freak, then the obvious response from the trickster asking the question is: Then why has America survived so long? In nature almost all mutations quickly die out. They can rarely survive into a second generation, much less a third.

And America is into somewhere around its 118th generation of de facto self-governance, while, before the 1787 Constitution, there is no recorded history of a real nation (bigger than a tribe) ever making it past one. (Agreed, also prior to 1787, almost all history was written by “scribes of the kings”, the real name for “historians” for millennia, so there could have been dozens of nascent self-governed peoples who were simply squished, or gobbled up by a next-door invading king, only they were too small and insignificant to rate a page in the “annals of the king” being prepared by his historians.)

In fact, the archaeological record of pre-dynastic Egypt suggests this is how several tribes of farm people in the Nile region slowly morphed into an organized hierarchical “corporation”, with a chairman of the board king, a head priest, and every other person in the realm owing some duty to them. Subjects.

The Egyptians and a few other empires in a region from the eastern Mediterranean to the Indus Valley (India) started this process of “civilization” about 3000 BC, 5000 years ago. And they did many wondrous things, especially building things that for generations for centuries could; i.e. monuments to themselves, which was their purpose.

They didn’t just sort of spring up. Any fifth grader can make a list of all the things necessary for a “civilization” to grow and survive; food, water source, commerce, housing, security, common language…but the fifth grader will likely not know to include the intangibles, such as common purpose, reciprocity, you know a code of conduct with one another which no religion I know of, save one, ever bothered to list. Every nation had a list of “how to get along with the Boss”, but no one that I know ever had a list of “how to get along with your neighbors”…except for a small tribe in central Mesopotamia[…]

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FIRST PRINCIPLES: FIRST IMPRESSIONS ABOUT AMERICA

Vassar Bushmills

Anyone, anywhere, who hears the name “America” already has a first impression about America; either positive or negative. It doesn’t matter if he/she is 18 or 80, and located anywhere in the world.

If abroad those impressions are a mixture of street talk, music, films, and of course, relatives who may have traveled there or live. One man from one village can go to America, and everyone in that valley has a impression of America that no government can conceal.

I knew such a family from Dayton whose father had come to America from a village in Slovakia before WWII, taking work in a steel mill. He left a wife and son back home. Just before the war he went back to bring his wife to America. But he had to leave his 6-year old behind with relatives to secure the family lands. Once in America, Papa and Mama Miluks started a new family, his youngest son my best friend for many years from the Army. In the late 1970s, while on duty in Germany, he was allowed to travel to Slovakia and meet his eldest brother and see the village and old home place, and of course, take gifts. When I visited his family in Dayton Mama Miluks showed me the special place she kept all her letters from her son, who she had not seen since 1940. But those letters! She wrote many-paged reports every week for over 40 years, giving a weekly account of things going on with his papa and brothers and sister, learning quickly to never speak of certain things, for by ’46 the Communists had moved in and her letters were first read and redacted by postal censors, cutting all references to the availability of consumer goods commonly available in America, especially food. Her son, in turn, would reply with heavily redacted letters. He would die in the early 1990’s of the general poor heath common to socialist countries so was never able to join his family. He never met his other two younger brothers or sister. And of course his last personal memory of his parents was when he was 6.

But I am quite sure every adult in that village had clear impressions of America because of Mr Miluks, who went to America.

I tell this story because one, it’s true, and two, it is, next to the Christian’s ideal of Heaven, an impression of America as a place that one has never been and most wants to go, which cannot be duplicated anywhere else. I have met people in several countries and four continents, including Palestinian Arabs (on an overnight sleeper in Russia) and from all I hear basically the same thing, “If only I could go to America.”

(This is not what we are seeing today on our southern border, by the way, so I won’t take this discussion in that direction, although just 30-40 years ago, down there, where I also lived, this was a common refrain, “If I can only get to America.” I deal with this subject in an upcoming conversation about Assimilation, which should be a topic of policy discussion if we can ever get fully in charge or our government again.)

So, abroad, America is viewed through two entirely different prisms, divided by two classes: 1) the political class and 2) all the rest[…]

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THE DAY THE MUSIC DIED; THE LOSS OF INNOCENCE ON AMERICA’S COLLEGE CAMPUSES

Vassar Bushmills

The lines of a ditty from the early 1960s suddenly popped into my head, recently.

It was late lest September, as well as I can remember

While strolling though the park in tipsy pride

Not a word did I utter, as I lay down in the gutter

And this pig came up and lay down by my side

Not a soul was I disturbing as I lay there by the curbing

When this high-tone lady came, and I heard her say…

“You may tell someone who boozes…by he company he chooses”

And the pig got up and slowly walked away 

I was 17 at the time, 56 years ago and I still remembered those words. See the video below, only because of the song.

It was sung by the New Christy Minstrels, a very popular folk group from the early 60s. and I saw them sing this live in concert in 1963. It was part of a medley of humorous ditties called Bits and Pieces and this grainy piece of film shows the group and the audience, mostly college kids.

Pay attention to the way the students responded to what would today be considered childish humor.

https://my.mail.ru/mail/emypas/video/63296/66388.html

(Sorry, no video link, so you gotta cut and paste)

This is a conversation I can only begin as I won’t live to see it finished, but we need to back and rethink some things.

In scrolling through YouTube videos of live performances filmed and recorded on college campuses by the top vocal groups of that period, the Kingston Trio, Peter Paul and Mary, and these New Christy Minstrels, I saw live in concert my senior year in high school in a sold out university basketball arena.

It never dawned on me then that this concert format would die before the end of the decade, as would the folk music craze in general. Pop bands and vocalists (both black and white) were popular since the mid-50s, Bill Haley, Buddy Holly and Elvis (I saw Elvis’ first appearance on Ed Sullivan in 1956, when the cameras only showed Elvis from the waist up.) the best examples, and I was a regular at a local youth center since 1957.

Folk music had been around for decades, and performed in clubs, but had no national following until the the Kingston Trio changed all that in 1958 with their Billboard #1 hit, “Tom Dooley” and the release of their namesake album, which consisted of an array of songs not found on other albums, including humor, parody, and borderline bawdy, all put together in a 12-track LP that would become the standard LP format through the 60s. (I think Iron Butterfly with “Inna Gadda da Vida” (1969) changed all that with a single song taking up the entire side 2. That and “Born to be Wild” (1969) by Steppenwolf were perhaps the only heavy metal songs I ever liked. But then again, I was not of that music generation. I was born in 1945 and married, in law school and on my way to the Army. Hard rock was the music of my brothers, born 1948 and 1951, who would have been college and high school age respectively in1969.)

I’m about to walk you through the Law of Music Generations, which is not the typical way we measure generations.

But I want to reveal it through the eyes of that 1962 audience who laughed and clapped as the New Christy Minstrels sang those silly ditties to an auditorium filled with obscenely conservative hair cuts and button-down attire.

It was the Kingston Trio who pioneered the 90-minute stage show before a packed auditorium, and they began their banter-style shows around 1960-61 on college campuses[…]

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(UPDATED) TOWARD A “THEORY OF THE MAN”

Vassar Bushmills

For almost everyone who pops up in the news, I have a general theory of that person, beginning with how they got in the news in the first place.

If WAPO or New York Times said something approvingly about them, my starting point is likely to be a minus -1. Disapprovingly? Plus +1. The media is my built-in bias meter.

But that bias can quickly be corrected if it turns out that what WAPO or NYT said was factually true. It would not change my overall opinion about either of them unless they actually got the facts right several times in a row, which indicate they may have changed their bias on a given subject.

Neither have in over 50 years.

A personal Theory of a Man or Woman is not something you generally publish. It’s an internal mechanism to remind yourself that there are rules of critical thinking, as opposed to giving over to raw emotion. It’s a reminder of who you are, not who an updated Donald Trump or Mitch McConnell is. You’d be surprised at how many so-called conservative writers have never engaged in this simple practice. It should be a regular as morning prayers. Only those under 45 don’t even know it exists. this.

I did a complete-180 on one Theory of a Man I had, in 2013, when hall of fame conservative George Will came down to Virginia on behalf of one of his life-long employers, WAPO, to do a hit piece on Ken Cuccinelli, in his race for governor against the unindicted Clinton skid-greaser, Terry McAuliffe. No fan of the Democrats, mind you, Will put his support behind an empty-suit Libertarian (these are easy to hire in any state election D’s think can be made closer). and indeed Rob Sarvis was the difference maker in that election. This allowed Will to come out of the closet about religion, allowing that Christians, (Cuccinelli is Roman Catholic) are worse even than the Left’s atheism, with which George Will agrees.

My theory about George Will, totally flipped, so I am de-e-elighted to see that just by Donald Trump living and breathing in the White House, George Will rarely draws a “Theory of the Man” consideration by anyone anymore. Irrelevant.

Every person should have a “theory of the man” process embedded in their minds. For one, it’s a shield against raw emotion, and the high degree of probability that our emotions can cause us to say or do something irrational that will cause other people to alter their theory of us[…]

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